Before I forget.

Written by Trish Vradenburg and Special Guests

By 2020 Blog

May 8, 2018 - Marie Marley

There is substantial research supporting the notion that activities involving pets (and in some cases stuffed animals) can be beneficial to people living with Alzheimer’s. These activities usually reach those in the latest stages of the disease—even when they no longer talk or recognize loved ones. Here is some down-to-earth, practical advice on how to involve pets and stuffed animals to engage, comfort, communicate with, and bring joy to your loved one who is living with dementia.

March 12, 2018 - Marie Marley

Finding_JoyLester Potts, the father of neurologist, Daniel C. Potts, MD, FAAN, had never held a paintbrush in his life. When he developed Alzheimer’s, he eventually began going to a daycare program. While there, they encouraged him to paint with water colors. Lester produced stunning paintings, and later became an artist of acclaim. His work brought joy to him and to all who viewed it. In fact, Dr.

February 26, 2018 - Michael Ellenbogen

My daughter recently bought me a Google Home Mini. As someone who lives with dementia and used to be a leader in the IT field, I always thought one could be helpful to me and many folks with disabilities. I quickly realized I was wrong. To be sure, there are a number of helpful things that I can do with the Google Home Mini. For example, I can ask any questions -- what is the temperature or when will it snow? I can ask information about the latest news, and set reminders for meetings and deadlines.

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Activists
February 20, 2018 - George Vradenburg

This op-ed originally appear in The Hill newspaper on February 15, 2018. 

In an era of extreme partisanship, there is one issue that continues to inspire collaboration and even comradery among members of both parties: the fight to stop Alzheimer’s. Click here to continue reading.

February 7, 2018 - Marie Marley

Music has the power to reach people with Alzheimer’s disease on a deep level. Many patients can sing songs long after their Alzheimer’s has progressed beyond the point of recognizing loved ones, dressing themselves, or even remembering what happened five minutes earlier.

I personally used to listen to music on a regular basis with my 92-year-old Romanian soul mate and he always enjoyed it. His face would light up and he would move in time with the music. Sometimes he would hum along.

stamp
November 6, 2017 - Lynda Everman

The release of the Alzheimer's stamp represents eighteen years of continuous effort on the part of friend and fellow advocate Kathy Siggins, and nine years of continuous effort on my part. If you think that one or two people cannot make a difference, I hope you will read on and take this as proof that each of us can.

September 8, 2017 - Rev. Dr. John Hagedorn

Mark 6:31 Jesus said to them, “Come away to a deserted place all by yourselves and rest a while.”

The disciples had just learned that John the Baptist had been executed and they came and told Jesus.

They also told Jesus of all they had done and taught. Then Jesus extended to them an invitation to take care of themselves after all they had heard and done.  I have learned so much from this invitation and four words just popped out:  Come-Away-Rest-A While!

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caregiver
Seasons of Caring
July 18, 2017 - Jamal Rahman

Do what is beautiful. God loves those who do what is beautiful. - Qur’an 2:195

Help God! - Qur’an 47:7

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Clergy
July 6, 2017 - Rabbi Michael Lerner

Editor's note: Rabbi Michael Lerner gave a moving eulogoy in honor of his sister and UsAgainstAlzheimer's co-founder Trish Vradenburg at the May service celebrating Trish's life. Rabbi Lerner's remarks are reprinted here in their entirety.

June 28, 2017 - Shawn Taylor

June is PTSD Awareness Month. The rapidly growing number of Americans with Alzheimer’s disease includes an increasing number of military veterans who may be at increased risk for dementia as a consequence of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and brain injuries suffered in service.

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